Hevezi, Endre (BA. (Architcture) Technical University of Budapest 1945, MA (Arch) London University 1958)
Endre Hevezi was born in Szeged, Hungary in 1923
His career as an artist started in Denmark in the late forties. Here he painted portraits and landscapes (mainly of Hungarian motifs) and exhibited them in Copenhagen. Stockholm,Odense and several Scandinavian cities. His large scale works of this period include the wall paintings and external stoneware decorations of the Meeting House of Ikast and the altar piece of the church of Alderslyst.
Having moved to England, after a couple of months of physical labour in Booths and Colcloug’s table ware factory in Stoke-on-Trent, he became the designer of the firm. As such did he win the scholarship and title “designer scholar” of the Federation of British Pottery Manufacturers, in 1951.
However, the limited scope of traditional table ware design did not satisfy him and he moved to London. Here, initially he had to take a job as an architect, but never stopped painting and took part in several group exhibitions. His first one-man show at the Drian Gallery in 1968 was followed by number of others, in London, Southampton, Marlborough and other English cities as well as in Budapest, Szeged and Csongrád. Exhibited with artist’s societies from Tokyo to Vancouver in many places.
He is a founding member of the British Society of Enamellers. With his vitrified enamel pictures he won first prize at the biennale of La Cruna (1988) of Madrid (1998) and a prize in Budapest (2001).
His religious works include a set of ceramic panels symbolizing the Stations of the Cross at the catholic church of Hartley Witney, and, using the same technoque, twelve wall panels of Eucharistic symbols at the Allan Hall Catholic Seminary in Chelsea. His most significant work of this kind is the decoration of the Debra Libanos Cathedral in Ethiopia.

Hevezi, Endre (BA. (Architcture) Technical University of Budapest 1945, MA (Arch) London University 1958)
Endre Hevezi was born in Szeged, Hungary in 1923
His career as an artist started in Denmark in the late forties. Here he painted portraits and landscapes (mainly of Hungarian motifs) and exhibited them in Copenhagen. Stockholm,Odense and several Scandinavian cities. His large scale works of this period include the wall paintings and external stoneware decorations of the Meeting House of Ikast and the altar piece of the church of Alderslyst.
Having moved to England, after a couple of months of physical labour in Booths and Colcloug’s table ware factory in Stoke-on-Trent, he became the designer of the firm. As such did he win the scholarship and title “designer scholar” of the Federation of British Pottery Manufacturers, in 1951.
However, the limited scope of traditional table ware design did not satisfy him and he moved to London. Here, initially he had to take a job as an architect, but never stopped painting and took part in several group exhibitions. His first one-man show at the Drian Gallery in 1968 was followed by number of others, in London, Southampton, Marlborough and other English cities as well as in Budapest, Szeged and Csongrád. Exhibited with artist’s societies from Tokyo to Vancouver in many places.
He is a founding member of the British Society of Enamellers. With his vitrified enamel pictures he won first prize at the biennale of La Cruna (1988) of Madrid (1998) and a prize in Budapest (2001).
His religious works include a set of ceramic panels symbolizing the Stations of the Cross at the catholic church of Hartley Witney, and, using the same technoque, twelve wall panels of Eucharistic symbols at the Allan Hall Catholic Seminary in Chelsea. His most significant work of this kind is the decoration of the Debra Libanos Cathedral in Ethiopia.

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