Reginald Haggar was born in Ipswich, Suffolk, and studied at the Royal College of Art in London.

In 1929 he came to Stoke-on-Trent to become assistant director at Minton’s pottery factory.

However his ideas for modern designs didn’t sit well with the more traditionalist impulses of the pottery industry at a time of financial hardship. Haggar resigned in 1935, but worked for many years as a freelance consultant to the pottery industry.

In 1934 he was appointed head of Stoke School of Art, and later became head of Burslem School of Art. from 1945 he became a full-time artist, as well as pottery researcher and author on English pottery and many other subjects.

In 1943, Reginald Haggar founded the Society of Staffordshire Artists and was president from 1945 to 1977. In 1966 he set up the North Staffordshire Watercolour Group.

Haggar’s watercolours of Stoke-on-Trent provide an important record of the Potteries landscape and are influenced by his interest in, and knowledge of, the industry. With his bottlescapes, he chronicled the destruction and dereliction in the 1960s and 1970s. He was literally chasing the bulldozers, keen to record sites before they were demolished.

Reginald Haggar was born in Ipswich, Suffolk, and studied at the Royal College of Art in London.

In 1929 he came to Stoke-on-Trent to become assistant director at Minton’s pottery factory.

However his ideas for modern designs didn’t sit well with the more traditionalist impulses of the pottery industry at a time of financial hardship. Haggar resigned in 1935, but worked for many years as a freelance consultant to the pottery industry.

In 1934 he was appointed head of Stoke School of Art, and later became head of Burslem School of Art. from 1945 he became a full-time artist, as well as pottery researcher and author on English pottery and many other subjects.

In 1943, Reginald Haggar founded the Society of Staffordshire Artists and was president from 1945 to 1977. In 1966 he set up the North Staffordshire Watercolour Group.

Haggar’s watercolours of Stoke-on-Trent provide an important record of the Potteries landscape and are influenced by his interest in, and knowledge of, the industry. With his bottlescapes, he chronicled the destruction and dereliction in the 1960s and 1970s. He was literally chasing the bulldozers, keen to record sites before they were demolished.

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